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Crapo Hill Landfill The Crapo Hill Landfill is a 152 acre landfill in Dartmouth that serves the community of Dartmouth and New Bedford. Constructed in 1994 by the Greater New Bedford Regional Refuse Management District it was the culmination of twenty years of planning and development. The facility has won numerous awards for excellence management and will provide service to the needs of the community for approximately 47 years. Dan Perry acted as counsel for the District beginning in 1983 and acted as its counsel in connection with the acquisition of the property, securing zoning, wetlands and environmental permitting including authorization to operate from theRead More →

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Corson Maritime Learning Center Over 250 people, including politicians, historic preservation advocates, community members, park staff and volunteers attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Corson Maritime Learning Center on May 16, 2008. The event was the culmination of an 11 year, $6.4 million project. The Corson Building, which is located next to the park visitor center, consists of two three-story brick structures built in 1875 and 1884. For many years the Corson Building housed Moby-Dick Marine Specialties on its first floor, a popular shopping stop for visitors to the historic district. In 1997, a devastating fire ripped through the building. The Waterfront Historic Area LeaguERead More →

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Joseph Grinnell Mansion Designed by Providence architect Russell Warren, this mansion was the first Greek revival structure built in New Bedford. It was built between 1831 and 1832 for Joseph Grinnell, a whaling merchant, manufacturer, and packet trader. Joseph also served four terms as a representative in the U.S. Congress. Joseph’s father Cornelius Grinnell, was a sea captain and privateer during the Revolutionary War. The large building was constructed using granite from the same quarry (Quincy, MA) as the Bunker Hill Monument in Boston, The front of the building features full height pillars and a large portico. Abraham Lincoln, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy AdamsRead More →

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Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust (DNRT) is a non-profit, membership-supported organization, formed in 1971 by community members concerned about the future of Dartmouth. Over the years, DNRT has helped permanently protect nearly 5,000 acres of wetlands, wildlife habitat, farmland, forests, and scenic landscapes in Dartmouth, making it one of the most successful land trusts in the state. DNRT currently owns 1,530 acres in 52 Reserves, and stewards 37 conservation restrictions on another 1,000 acres. They also maintain 40 miles of walking trails.Read More →

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1762 Elihu Akin House The Akin House is one of the oldest houses in Dartmouth and one of a few remaining in Dartmouth which predates the Revolution. The Akin House is being conserved to serve as the region’s first Cultural Heritage Center. It will be an innovative heritage tourism site where visitors will learn about the post and beam construction of the 18th century (its architecture), the history of Dartmouth and the families who lived in the historic house.Read More →

Our Philosophy We are dedicated to understanding our clients’ needs and providing them with practical and cost-effective legal advice, representation, solutions and quality legal services. Our attorneys have years of legal expertise and have handled numerous cases and projects of significant complexity and substantial economic and social import. We believe that our expertise in addressing cutting edge issues in such fields as estate taxation, land use, environmental permitting and wealth management is unmatched by any firm in our geographic area, and competitive with metropolitan firms that have infrastructure, costs, and billing rates that are substantially higher than ours. By providing high quality legal services inRead More →

William Rodman Mansion The William R. Rodman Mansion at 388 County Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts was constructed in 1833 as the home of bank president and whaling merchant, William Rotch Rodman. The architect of the granite mansion was Russell Warren, the Rhode Island designer who created the Greek Revival style in Southern New England. During the 1830′s Warren designed for New Bedford’s whaling elite over a dozen private homes and public buildings, which were seminal in the development of Greek Revival architecture. The house remains on its original site and has received minimal alteration. After the death of William R. Rodman in 1855, the houseRead More →

Firm History The firm originally grew out of the friendship of the late Edward Hicks and Leonard Perry, who had been friends from their childhood, and graduated together from New Bedford High School in 1937. They met again after World War II as classmates at Harvard Law School, and both graduated in 1948. In 1965, together with Paul McCawley, they formed a law partnership named Perry, Hicks & McCawley, and began practice at the Masonic Building at 558 Pleasant Street, New Bedford.  Now known as Perry Hicks, LLC, the firm has continuously practiced in New Bedford since its founding. Daniel Perry, son of Leonard Perry, isRead More →

Municipal Law The firm has been continuously awarded Martindale Hubble’s highest rating -av- since its founding. During its history, it has represented many of the leading institutions and businesses in southeastern Massachusetts. The firm has particularly specialized in municipal law, and has over time acted as counsel to eleven municipalities in the area, as well as a number of specialized districts and boards.Read More →